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Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Nome, Alaska Braces For Start of Gold Rush Part Deux | Alaska Dispatch

Nome, Alaska Braces For Start of Gold Rush Part Deux | Alaska Dispatch:

"Gold Rush Part Deux unfolding in Nome - Craig Medred | May 22, 2012

The news coming out of Nome, Alaska reads like something from 100 years ago: "Five hundred tons of mining equipment is on the way to Nome with Northland Service’s first barge,'' the Nome Nugget reported this week.

This could be the early days of the Alaska Gold Rush, but it's not. This is Gold Rush Part Deux.

Thank the skyrocketing price of the yellow metal and television. There has always been gold in the beaches of the fabled City of the Golden Sands. Mining in Nome waned after the early Gold Rush but never stopped. There were always people pulling money out of the ground, which is what drew the Discovery Channel north to start filming the reality show "Bering Sea Gold."

read more about Nome Alaska prospecting boom

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Monday, May 14, 2012

State Park Closure: CALIFORNIA STATE MINERAL AND MINING MUSEUM: Trip #40 of 70

State Park Closures Trip: CALIFORNIA STATE MINERAL AND MINING MUSEUM: Trip #40 of 70: "CALIFORNIA STATE MINERAL AND MINING MUSEUM"

The Fricot Nugget (pictured ) weighs thirteen pounds and is one of the finest and largest examples of crystal-lized native gold in the world. It is the largest surviving specimen from California’s Gold Rush era and can be seen in the vault at theCalifornia State Mining and Mineral Museum in Mariposa. 

It was discovered in 1865 near Georgetown



Sadly, the Fricot Nugget is once again getting ready to do a disappearing act.  visit on May 10 found the museum already packing their contents for shipment to a warehouse in Sacramento, in preparation for the July 1 closure. Artifacts will be stored there until money is once again available for the parks to re-open. In other words, maybe never.    ...read more

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